TILE TRANSFORMATIONS



Topps tiles


OUR CHALLENGE

Topps Tiles has community links across the UK thanks to their store and trade network. The challenge was to deepen those relationships and engage with the communities. To reward worthy community projects across the UK, a competition was created where the first prize was £2,000 of Topps Tiles vouchers to renovate a space in need of a little TLC. To bring the competition to life, we promoted it through their owned channels and encouraged broader coverage (and back links) through a programme of digital outreach.

OUR APPROACH

Content

We began by creating a short, charming animation that captured the essence of the competition and drove traffic to the Topps Tile competition page. The aim of this content was to create something engaging and shareable, something that would cut through other social noise, and that online media owners would be happy to host or link to from their sites.



Social

We launched the competition through Topps Tiles’ social channels, specifically Facebook and Twitter, creating dedicated social assets and posts to support the competition through to its end date. This proved to be pivotal to the performance of the campaign, giving people the (easier) alternative option to support the competition through their social channels.

Digital Outreach

We focused on DIY blogs, local grant and funding sites, community groups and village hall associations, as well as some of the better-known local and national titles. Grant and funding sites were particularly happy to get behind the initiative, promoting it through their own social channels, their e-newsletters and their websites.


Topps Tiles FAcebook Mobile.jpg

WHAT WE DELIVERED

  • Earned media strategy
  • 30 second animation 
  • Social campaign
  • Digital outreach programme pre- and post-campaign
  • Blogger activity

RESULTS

  • 53 participating organisations
  • 15 x more back links than the previous campaign
  • Social reach of over 500,000
  • 77 items of online coverage, including The Evening Standard